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For the 3rd year in a row, VMware has given us the honors by hosting their Site Recovery Manager (SRM) Hands-on-lab (HOL) using our own FalconStor Storage Replication Adapter (SRA) for SRM, and our FalconStor Network Storage Server Virtual Appliance (NSS VA), which is a VMware-certified Storage Virtual Appliance for vSphere v4.1 and v5.0. 

The VMware HCL listing for our NSS VA can be viewed here:
Published in VMworld 2011 USA

It was on the last day of VMworld 2010 in San Francisco where it happened.  I was sitting at a Lab Station at the Moscone West building, learning a few things myself on vCloud Director.  Suddenly, one of the VMware Lab Staff member announced: "We have just reached a new milestone just moments ago, we have served our 145th THOUSAND (145K) virtual machine being deployed and destroyed)!  We all clapped our hands, we all enjoyed this moment of glory for the world of virtualization!

There were several labs available, and each lab required an average of 9 VM's to be deployed.  All in all, 15,300 complete labs were served out to attendees of the event, during those 4 days, at a rate of 4000 VM's per hour (created then destroyed).  The vCloud Director was a very popular lab, being a new product focused on the ever popular "Cloud Computing," as well as the VMware View lab for Virtual Desktop Infrastructure.

Site Recovery Manager was also more popular than ever.  Did you know that for every SRM lab served out, 2 Virtual Storage Appliances (VSA) were deployed, one at the "Protected Site", and one at the "Recovery Site?"  We are talking about thousands of FalconStor NSS-VA's, the VSA technology adopted by VMware as the storage and replication technology of choice to power the SRM lab!  Yes, which means, if you took the SRM Lab, you actually used and managed FalconStor Storage, with FalconStor's Storage Replication Adapter for SRM.  So did thousands of other attendees.

The beauty about virtualization is that it enables things to be completely transparent, elastic, and automated -- the platform enablement for the cloud.  FalconStor has been at the forefront of storage virtualization innovations, ever since its creation a decade ago.  Our Continous Data Protector (CDP) for SRM solution, is available as both a Virtual Appliance (NSS-VA), and in the form of a highly available physical system (CDP Gateway).  It was logical for VMware to pair FalconStor CDP with VMware vSphere to create the SRM Lab at VMworld 2010 (and also at VMworld 2009): ESX and its hosted VM's can run on pretty much any modern x86 servers, for the vSphere portion, while FalconStor CDP can enable remote replication and storage I/O acceleration on pretty much any storage platform (local disk, SAN, etc...), even if the 2 storage platforms on the Primary and Recovery Sites are not the same type of storage array make or model, and even if those arrays are not capable themselves of supporting advanced features such as remote replication or I/O acceleration.  This "heterogenous replication" capability is huge, especially with the growth in popularity of cloud computing, and it's available today.

With FalconStor CDP, and just as thousands of you have witnessed during the VMworld 2010 Lab sessions, Disaster Recovery for your datacenters can be enabled easily, efficiently, cost-effectively, and transparently.  Yes, hundreds of time an hour, VMware (well, really it was you, the lab attendees) deployed and  destroyed virtual datacenters, including the SAN Infrastructure and all of its data.  And hundreds of times an hour, FalconStor saved the world (well, not us, but again, you, the lab users, who were following the lab instructions!) by replicating the data to the remote site and recovering the protected Virtual Machines at the DR site successfully, simply at a click of a button.  That's the beauty of Storage Virtualization, and being "Totally Open!"

So when the 145,000th virtual machine was served out during the VMworld Lab session, I couldn't help thinking:  "Yes, it's that easy!"  Virtualization is really a beautiful thing, and only by virtualizing both your server and storage infrastructure can you achieve a level of automation, platform independence, transparency, and elasticity, that will bring full mobility in your public and private clouds.  So why put off until tomorrow what you can do today?

Published in VMworld 2010 Europe

It was on the last day of VMworld 2010 in San Francisco where it happened.  I was sitting at a Lab Station at the Moscone West building, learning a few things myself on vCloud Director.  Suddenly, one of the VMware Lab Staff member announced: "We have just reached a new milestone just moments ago, we have served our 145th THOUSAND (145K) virtual machine being deployed and destroyed)!  We all clapped our hands, we all enjoyed this moment of glory for the world of virtualization!

There were several labs available, and each lab required an average of 9 VM's to be deployed.  All in all, 15,300 complete labs were served out to attendees of the event, during those 4 days, at a rate of 4000 VM's per hour (created then destroyed).  The vCloud Director was a very popular lab, being a new product focused on the ever popular "Cloud Computing," as well as the VMware View lab for Virtual Desktop Infrastructure.

Site Recovery Manager was also more popular than ever.  Did you know that for every SRM lab served out, 2 Virtual Storage Appliances (VSA) were deployed, one at the "Protected Site", and one at the "Recovery Site?"  We are talking about thousands of FalconStor NSS-VA's, the VSA technology adopted by VMware as the storage and replication technology of choice to power the SRM lab!  Yes, which means, if you took the SRM Lab, you actually used and managed FalconStor Storage, with FalconStor's Storage Replication Adapter for SRM.  So did thousands of other attendees.

Published in VMworld 2010 USA
Thursday, 17 December 2009 01:33

The Top Technologies of 2010

Wow, time sure does fly. It has been a while since my last blog here! I have not just been goofing off though, believe me (maybe we can discuss this over a cold one?!) If you have not seen it yet, I have been doing some blogging over at Computerworld, and also hanging out with my buddies over at storage monkeys. My Computer world blogs have been about Cloud computing and virtualization, and I came across an interesting reply on the subject, with a link to a another good blog by Ed Koehler. I have also been doing some research lately on technical innovations, and would love some feedback here as to which you think will be the hottest in 2010. My current list for top 2010 technologies include:

Published in Storage Virtualization
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